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Author Topic: Elder|Disabled Care  (Read 2577 times)
littleman
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« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2017, 05:44:26 PM »

My wife's uncle is sight impaired and he has a viewer which helps him read, it is essentially a auto-focus camera mounted on top of a large monitor with some computer controlled enhancements. The device went into firmware update mode and needed to be serviced before it worked again -- it was a real PITA and requires a Windows computer to get it done.

If he didn't have access to a relatively tech savvy person with normal vision the device would have essentially been bricked.  As I was there servicing the thing I started asking him questions about it; it turns out the device costs $5k.  It seems to me that something like that should be able to be built for much much less.  I could probably make the equivalent with about $300 worth of parts retail.

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rcjordan
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« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2017, 01:30:02 AM »

self-driving wheelchair

https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/24/taking-a-ride-in-mits-self-driving-wheelchair/
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« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2017, 06:21:32 PM »

Full voice control of your Chrome browser via your Amazon Echo

http://www.browserhelp.me/
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rcjordan
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« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2017, 03:27:39 PM »

8 Assistive Technology Devices for Seniors Living at Home

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/assistive-technology-devices-seniors/

LM, there's a magnifier in there:

Quote
one of the best is the USB Dolphin SuperNova Magnifier. The app magnifies on-screen text up to 64 times ó youíll get roughly three lines of text on your entire screen. All the worldís most common languages are supported.
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rcjordan
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« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2017, 12:48:54 PM »

Keen-Eyed Robot Goes to Work for a Paralyzed Veteran
https://www.wired.com/story/a-keen-eyed-robot-goes-to-work-for-a-paralyzed-veteran/

ELLIēQ
https://www.intuitionrobotics.com/elliq/

They overshot the puppy goal, but getting close...
Kuri
https://www.heykuri.com/living-with-a-personal-robot


Wired source article:
https://www.wired.com/story/companion-robots-are-here
« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 12:50:47 PM by rcjordan » Logged
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« Reply #20 on: August 16, 2017, 03:03:02 PM »

Time spent frail in old age 'doubles'
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Between 1991 and 2011, life expectancy increased by more than four years for both men and women to 82.6 and 85.6 respectively.
But the number of those years spent with substantial care needs rose much more rapidly, from 1.1 to 2.4 for men and 1.6 to three for women.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40942531
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littleman
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« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2017, 04:43:47 PM »

I suspect it will double again, we've become very good at keeping sick people alive.

I hope I am lucky enough to follow a life pattern of Jack LaLanne, active, active, active, boom dead.

This thread is interesting because we're searching for a technology substitute for community and multi-generational family iteration.  A few years back there was a study that found that Hispanic Americans live longer than non-Hispanic White Americans despite having less education and income on average.

https://www.theatlantic.com/notes/2015/11/hispanic-paradox/414304/
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    What I find shocking isnít so much that non-Hispanic U.S. whites with less than a high school education are suffering in the highly unstable economic climate that has gotten progressively worse since the 1970s. What I find surprising, and what this article didnít mention, is how U.S. Hispanics have been tracking down in average mortality rates since 1990, on par with the UK and even better than France and Germany. And this despite the fact that U.S. Hispanics tend to have even less education on average than U.S. whites, and that, proportionally, more U.S. Hispanics live in poverty and with less secure healthcare than U.S. whites.

    There are other major variables at work hereómost likely robust family cohesion and less social isolation among middle-aged U.S. Hispanics when compared to middle-aged U.S. whites. As a Hispanic American, I can attest that, anecdotally, robust family and social cohesion is definitely the case.

Maybe along with the service robots technology will help the elderly & disabled feel more of a sense of community and belonging.  I think it is probably doing that a little these days with FB and video chat, but a robust, locally focused social network would help a lot.  I've seen a lot of cases of old widows/widowers locked up in their homes, having very little interaction with the outside world and waiting out the clock.  If I go to Chinatown in SF I'll see very old Cantonese people hanging out in the park together, talking and playing their games.  I think that daily interaction is keeping those folks alive, many of them look to be on the plus side of 95.
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Rupert
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« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2017, 09:25:32 PM »

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but a robust, locally focused social network would help a lot.

And there is the answer to the work problem.  People look after people.

Young and old.

Great sense of self worth there.
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« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2017, 09:56:56 PM »

>people look after people

You haven't hired many long-term care attendants, eh, Rupert?  The percentage of thieving, lying, cheating assholes in this trade approaches 100%.  Unfortunately, my family has a lot of experience.

>active, boom dead.

I used to chide my mom about her 'elder years' --she kept talking like everyone just blinked out like light bulbs. Doesn't happen all that often now.  She was 4 years in the nursing home.

<added -Trav & I were just discussing this>
Switzerland "allows assisted suicide as long as there are no 'self-seeking motives' involved. Switzerland has tolerated the creation of organisations such as Dignitas and Exit, which provide assisted dying services for a fee."

http://www.dignitas.ch/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4&Itemid=44&lang=en
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Rupert
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« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2017, 05:58:30 AM »

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You haven't hired many long-term care attendants, eh, Rupert?

A few. Father in law has quite bad altzimers now, and we have people going in 3 times a day. He shouts at me as I "Stole his car" and hit Sue, so we do our best to keep away to lower the anger levels. He still lives in the community but with loads of help, and I expect him to be in a home before Christmas. 

My Dad had a short term helpas Mum did the caring. A friend (ex nurse) was one.  So far we have been Lucky. But yes, Nursing homes have a dreadful reputation in the UK.

Anecdotally, I was talking with Pete and Colin about it a few years back, and one of them spoke of a care home that would only allow you in if you had a catheter fitted.

And that is why more people will have to do it, not just the  thieving, lying, cheating assholes Smiley
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littleman
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« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2017, 08:23:02 AM »

This is a very good idea:
https://matadornetwork.com/abroad/cant-go-abroad-learn-language-skype-elderly-instead/
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Rupert
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« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2017, 08:40:51 AM »

Nice find..  ver good.

I bet there are other things the elderly can do if they still have their wits.... not sure I can think of many at the mo though Sad

with technology:
  • Teaching lanuage
  • voting
  • advice
  • talking to each other
  • monitoring things remotely

A Bit of a thin list...

[/list]
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rcjordan
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« Reply #27 on: August 30, 2017, 06:44:53 PM »

TruSense sensors help keep seniors safe at home

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By combining wireless sensors, the Amazon Echo Dot, and GPS technology, TruSense is able to track seniorsí daily activities and health statistics, and send that data to family members and caregivers.

https://www.digitaltrends.com/home/trusense-seniors-sensors/
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