Author Topic: Tesla’s New Lithium-Ion Patent  (Read 2545 times)

rcjordan

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littleman

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Re: Tesla’s New Lithium-Ion Patent
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2020, 08:22:03 PM »
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The 1 million-mile battery is integral to Musk’s plans for fleets of ‘robotaxis’ and long-haul trucks, both of which would strain the ranges and lifetimes of the current Li-Ion batteries found in Tesla’s passenger vehicles.

Tesla’s best performing models have a maximum single-charge battery range of 370 miles – just short of the distance between Baltimore, MD and Boston, MA. – and a lifespan of 300,000 - 500,000 miles. This is impressive, given that the average lifespan of a car in the US is 150,000 miles, or roughly 11 years using the AAA annual average of 13,500 miles per year.


If true, this adds  some weight to Tony Seba's prediction.

rcjordan

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Re: Tesla’s New Lithium-Ion Patent
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2020, 09:29:00 PM »
For the individual EV owner, it cuts the risk of battery replacement $$$$ way down.

That said, I need more range and charging speed (convenience) before I get serious. 

ergophobe

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Re: Tesla’s New Lithium-Ion Patent
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2020, 10:22:27 PM »
I've been looking into a whole house battery. The thing is, "lithium ion" is a catchall term.

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Energy storage systems – not just electric cars – are going to benefit from quadrupling of the cycling power. This will make storage cheaper and more efficient, further speeding up transition to electric power and renewables.

Tesla uses the typical NMC (aka "cobalt" ion) battery. That is because it has the highest energy density, which is important in applications where you are actually moving that mass. In other applications it is not.

So, for example, Lithium Ferro Phosphate batteries already have way better cycle life than the NMC batteries. The LFPs are warranted for 10,000 cycles (min capacity after 10K cycles = 80% of original). The downside is the energy density is lower (I think about 15%) so you lose range by hauling that extra weight around.

Great for homes, but not good for vehicles. They have other advantages over NMC: no thermal runaway problem, no need to preheat the battery the charge efficiently, no cobalt (environmental and social issues there).

So there are already battery technologies that achieve the lifecycle benefits of this, but their added weight causes more range problems in vehicles.

Anyway, the point being that  we are still in the early phases of battery tech and I would not be surprised if the battery of 2030 will have huge performance enhancements, but I don't think a single battery tech will win for both vehicles and fixed storage.

I don't know of any domain - skis, motorcycles, bikes, computers - where you can optimize across many parameters at once and beat a product that is optimized for just one task.

My guess is that Tesla will win the vehicle storage race, but perhaps not the fixed storage race.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 10:26:50 PM by ergophobe »

ergophobe

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Re: Tesla’s New Lithium-Ion Patent
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2020, 08:46:08 PM »
A Million-Mile Battery From China Could Power Your Electric Car
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-06-07/a-million-mile-battery-from-china-could-power-your-electric-car

So what's the Giga Factory producing?