Author Topic: Stick a fork in it; Radio is dead  (Read 2169 times)

rcjordan

  • I'm consulting the authorities on the subject
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11035
  • Debbie says...
    • View Profile
Stick a fork in it; Radio is dead
« on: December 04, 2020, 06:41:49 PM »
At its peak in the mid-2000s, Radio Disney had a 97% reach across the country and had expanded to other platforms, such as satellite radio.

....technology has evolved, and radio is no longer the relevant medium for teens and tweens that it was 15 years ago.

And with celebrities increasingly communicating with young people on via social networks, such as Twitter and Instagram, the interviews and drop-bys on Radio Disney began to feel dated and insignificant.

Radio Disney Is Shutting Down: Why Disney Pulled The Plug
https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2020/12/04/radio-disney-is-shutting-down-why-disney-pulled-the-plug/

littleman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5480
    • View Profile
Re: Stick a fork in it; Radio is dead
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2020, 07:11:02 PM »
Internet is killing:
broadcast TV
cable
radio

Interesting though, the subscription model for content seems to be doing fine.  The old guard like HBO are just shifting the method of how people receive the content.  There's also the next gen streaming services that are thriving.

I think it will take many years until broadcast TV & radio are gone completely -- after a while it might be that all that's left is QVC/infomercial type of garbage and public radio/tv.

ergophobe

  • Inner Core
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 6414
    • View Profile
Re: Stick a fork in it; Radio is dead
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2020, 09:15:51 PM »
How about this idea... you say "the internet" but I would say the crucial component is random access.

What seem to be dying are models based on linear consumption. Some programmer at a radio or TV station decides what you access when. What is thriving are models where you decide what to access and when. The internet is just a delivery method that enables it.

In other words, if they had just put TV channels on the internet, nothing would have changed. Or, conversely, if the satellite or cable companies could have figured out random access models (say using your phone touchpad) and a good interface before Netflix became a dominant force, I'm not sure "the internet" would have won. They didn't do it because the old model was too lucrative while it lasted.

I see that differently than the internet wiping out travel agents. That's a case where there was a cost savings to the consumer by making travel planning a self-service activity, just like self-serve gas mostly eliminating gas station attendants.

I haven't fully thought out whether a random access model would really be possible without the internet or not, but that strikes me as the thing that is killing broadcast. Nobody will pay $10/month/channel for broadcast, but people are stacking up streaming services.

Self-curation might be important too. People will pay $10/channel/month if they can choose just the 4 channels they want and those 4 channels give random access to their entire catalog.

>>public radio/tv

And there's a great example. If you are a member, you can stream or watch broadcast. I'm guessing that eventually the broadcast arm will go away, just like sooner or later the DVD business on Netflix will go away. I don't know enough about broadcasting, though, to even guess what the marginal cost is of broadcasting content that you already have, especially in the case where you own the equipment already.

Thoughts?
« Last Edit: December 04, 2020, 09:18:55 PM by ergophobe »

littleman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5480
    • View Profile
Re: Stick a fork in it; Radio is dead
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2020, 06:21:18 AM »
Good points, its been over a decade since I've had cable, but I do remember that they were starting to offer movies on demand and pay per view for sporting events.  In some ways this are similar to the Netflix streaming model, bit I'd guess the technology (and probably vision) of the time limited the amount of content available.  I also remember it all being quite expensive.

If done well I think there can be value in curation, PBS and NPR will broaden my interest in ways I wouldn't seek out on my own.  Of course, most of the curation is done to maximize viewership/income, so that's not always the case.  We also have to acknowledge that this trend will push us further into our own information bubbles and possible promote further radicalization.  This is a real problem that I don't think we know how to address yet.

Brad

  • Inner Core
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3118
  • What, me worry?
    • View Profile
Re: Stick a fork in it; Radio is dead
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2020, 11:37:28 AM »
This is a shame because I'd like to see more hyper-local radio stations not less.  That was the dream with the very low wattage FM radio law 30 years ago.  (The range of those stations is only about a mile.)  Commercial radio lobby killed it.

grnidone

  • Inner Core
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1445
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - e
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Stick a fork in it; Radio is dead
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2020, 08:57:15 PM »
I love the fact that cable TV is dying.  f### those people.  They made a business out of ripping people off.  I haven't had cable since 1989...finally everyone else is figuring this out too.