Author Topic: MemoriesInDNA project wants your photos  (Read 307 times)

ergophobe

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MemoriesInDNA project wants your photos
« on: January 30, 2018, 08:11:25 PM »
After encoding texts and audio in DNA, now they want to encode 10,000 photos

http://www.futurity.org/memories-in-dna-project-1663072/

littleman

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Re: MemoriesInDNA project wants your photos
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2018, 10:02:52 PM »
This is really interesting stuff.

Quote
The basic process converts the strings of ones and zeroes in digital data into the four basic building blocks of DNA sequences—adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine. It employs synthetic DNA molecules created in a lab, not living DNA.

.....

“With proof-of-concept achieved for DNA as a digital data storage media, we are working to drive down the cost of synthesizing DNA to enable its potential as a widely-available commercial solution for the growing body of precious data in digital format, such as archival data, financial, and health record backups, and all long-term data retention where current media is not practical,” says Emily M. Leproust, CEO of Twist Bioscience. “MemoriesInDNA is a fabulous project to showcase the technological, scientific and cultural importance of DNA worldwide and we look forward to our role in this historic event.”


I'd like the encoding/decoding process explained a bit more.   It would be amazing DNA storage could be done in something a small and ubiquitous as a hard drive someday.

ergophobe

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Re: MemoriesInDNA project wants your photos
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2018, 10:09:56 PM »
I've been following this for a few years.

The thing to keep in mind is that it is, and probably always will be, an archival storage method, not a working memory method. Storage and retrieval is slow.

The big wins are that
 - storage density is very high
 - stability is very high not because the DNA doesn't break down, but because it can be created to replicate

Many years ago (15, maybe more), when people first started working on this, I kept trying to envision a science fiction book where one of the main characters would be The Librarian who would live in his library, which used giant sequoia trees for storage. Slime mold would certainly work better, but make a worse story. I never could get past that first, basic idea though