Author Topic: Retail is not dead  (Read 831 times)

Mackin USA

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Retail is not dead
« on: January 20, 2020, 10:59:27 AM »
at least Amazon doesn't think so...
Mr. Mackin

rcjordan

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Re: Retail is not dead
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2020, 01:01:58 PM »
Bricks retail is mortally wounded.  Other than groceries, cafes, restaurants, & large furniture, I can't recall purchasing more than $200 of products in stores in all of 2019.   

BTW, I was just reading about the old Blockbusters chain.   4500+ retail stores now gone.  Streaming is a bricks killer, too.

Mackin USA

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Re: Retail is not dead
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2020, 02:47:01 PM »
BRICKS RETAIL is old school.  8)
Mr. Mackin

ergophobe

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Re: Retail is not dead
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2020, 04:05:18 PM »
It's like a rough map of US population density. No surprise there.

But what jumps out is that it's also a rough map of areas that vote democratic. Some of that is obvious (California) and some of it is not (Texas). But overlay a map of Texas voting patterns over the Amazon map

https://www.texastribune.org/2018/01/29/analysis-texas-politics-size-matters/

If you're in a Democratic district in Texas, you probably have an Amazon warehouse close to you. I live in a very Republican district in California and Amazon does NOT offer next day delivery in our region. We have no carrier that offers overnight delivery of anything unless you pay for a high-priced courrier (at the hotel, a prince of Dubai recently had a case of his favorite wine delivered by courrier and, later, MacDonald's meals). My niece lives in Brooklyn. She gets same-day delivery of tons of stuff.

It suddenly strikes me that what party you vote for is somewhat predictive of how likely you are to be able to get next-day delivery of a given Amazon item...

I wonder how many other US cultural maps overlay with that. It maps pretty well with education
http://archives.maproomblog.com/2010/10/us_college_degrees_by_county.php

If you have a college degree, you are more likely to be eligible for next day Amazon delivery.

I realize the last two (college and political party) are mostly artifacts of population density, which is what really explains the location of the warehouses. Still, I find it interesting as just one more measure of the Big Sort. Of course, not everyone buys the Big Sort argument
https://www.hoover.org/research/myth-big-sort
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 04:16:41 PM by ergophobe »