Author Topic: "Home Away From Home" rejected by AdWords because of trademark  (Read 196 times)

ergophobe

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"Home Away From Home" rejected by AdWords because of trademark
« on: October 02, 2018, 08:33:51 PM »
Seriously? You can't use the phrase Home Away From Home in a Google Ad because it's covered by trademark?

A USPTO search turns up 43 registered marks with the phrase "Home Away From Home"

I was one time blocked at CafePress from creating clothing with the phrase "Caution! I'm Thinking" because someone had trademarked the use of the word Caution on all clothing (Buckworks was the entire target audience for that shirt and I got around it by changing the wording to "Warning! I'm Thinking").

Anyway, our patent, trademark and copyright law is so broken (in this case, it's a problem of application by Google, not the law itself - the marks themselves that I looked at appear perfectly valid).

buckworks

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Re: "Home Away From Home" rejected by AdWords because of trademark
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2018, 09:29:21 PM »
My grandkids love that shirt!  8)

Mackin USA

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Mr. Mackin

littleman

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Re: "Home Away From Home" rejected by AdWords because of trademark
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2018, 06:55:31 PM »
As it stands right now I am most happy with copyright law, less happy about trademark enforcement and I think the patent system needs drastic reform -- particularly when it comes to software.

ergophobe

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Re: "Home Away From Home" rejected by AdWords because of trademark
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2018, 07:28:03 PM »
As it stands right now I am most happy with copyright law

Huge media companies, notably Disney, lobbied hard to get copyright extended. This has nothing to do with protecting the rights of creators or making sure authors and photographers can eat. It has to do with supporting giant media conglomerates.

In recent decades, the strategy has been to keep lobbying for extensions, as with the so-called Mickey Mouse Act (real name: Copyright Term Extension Act). As it stands now, the 1998 act extended these terms to life of the author plus 70 years and for works of corporate authorship to 120 years after creation. That is just another example in our culture (US and Europe - this is one case where Europe is worse) of the "haves" trying to pull the ladder up after them and lobbying to mold the laws to make that happen.

Quote
. One author noted that we are “the first generation to deny our own culture to ourselves” since “no work created during your lifetime will, without conscious action by its creator, become available for you to build upon.”

It appears, however, that copyright will not get extended again. Real reform would return it to the 1970s standard (56 years). But at least stopping the growth, as is likely to happen on Jan 1, 2019, is a step in the right direction. All signs are that Mickey Mouse will become public domain in 2024.

So, agreed, it is not as arbitrary and inane as some of the patent BS, but copyright only appears "better" because what you're comparing it to is so broken :-)

https://alj.orangenius.com/mickey-mouse-keeps-changing-copyright-law/
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/01/hollywood-says-its-not-planning-another-copyright-extension-push/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_Term_Extension_Act
« Last Edit: October 03, 2018, 07:34:17 PM by ergophobe »

littleman

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Re: "Home Away From Home" rejected by AdWords because of trademark
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2018, 08:02:07 PM »
I agree that the time lengths are ridiculously long.  What I do like about it is that (at least in the US) a work has copyright protection the moment it is created and that registering ones copyright is very affordable.  In that sense, the copyright law is much more egalitarian than say patent law.