Author Topic: Article 13  (Read 100 times)

ukgimp

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Article 13
« on: September 13, 2018, 06:10:27 AM »
https://www.wired.co.uk/article/eu-article-13-passed-meme-war

Weird as F

The main points of contention are the directive's Article 11 and Article 13 — which detractors have dubbed, respectively, the "hyperlink tax" and the "upload filter."
« Last Edit: September 13, 2018, 06:31:09 AM by ukgimp »

aaron

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Re: Article 13
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2018, 05:29:41 PM »
Some countries which do not have large populations & are not parts of large trading blocks may end up pushing hard into regulatory arbitrage as the web gains further regulations from core markets.

It would be very hard (& expensive) to force regulations on virtual entities which are pure fictions located in country A, owned by a person in country B, hosted in country C, with some new regulation taking place in country D.

Hell, even some of the countries inside the EU are VERY slow at prosecuting intentional & extreme criminal conduct by some of their own citizens. In some cases a perp stating they committed major fraud and deserved to be locked away for a decade might find they are freely walking the streets a year or two after admitting to being a criminal fraud.

Brad

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Re: Article 13
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2018, 09:20:13 PM »
The big silos like Facebook, Twitter won't be able to evade such regulations, so it becomes a good argument  for smaller niche social networks like forums and small Mastodon or other instances.

aaron

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Re: Article 13
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2018, 09:44:55 PM »
I guess the point I was trying to make is there will still be all sorts of regulatory arbitrage across the platforms in terms of the local cost to be paid.

In the US
https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndtx/pr/previously-convicted-black-hat-search-engine-optimizer-sentenced-retaliating-against
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William Laurence Stanley, 54, of Dallas, Texas, a self-proclaimed black hat search engine optimizer and reputation manager was sentenced June 12, 2018, by U.S. District Judge Sidney A. Fitzwater to serve 97 months in federal prison and ordered to pay $5,605,226 in restitution, following a five-day trial in April 2017, announced U.S. Attorney Erin Nealy Cox of the Northern District of Texas.

In Europe
http://fortune.com/2018/09/13/tripadvisor-review-fraud-italy-promosalento/
Quote
TripAdvisor’s investigators then identified him, gathered evidence, punished the businesses that bought his services—by demoting them in the rankings—and then went to the police, which were already investigating thanks to a separate complaint.

In China
https://www.wsj.com/articles/amazon-investigates-employees-leaking-data-for-bribes-1537106401
Quote
In exchange for payments ranging from about $80 to more than $2,000, brokers for Amazon employees in Shenzhen are offering internal sales metrics and reviewers’ email addresses, as well as a service to delete negative reviews and restore banned Amazon accounts, the people said." ... "The going rate for having an Amazon employee delete negative reviews is about $300 per review, according to people familiar with the practice. Brokers usually demand a five-review minimum, meaning that sellers typically must pay at least $1,500 for the service, the people said. ... One Chinese Amazon seller said competition on the website had become so heated that he is tempted to use illicit tactics to gain an edge. “If I don’t do bad things, I will die,” he said of his business.