Author Topic: 30 grams of protein per meal: Above that is wasted in terms of muscle-building  (Read 669 times)

rcjordan

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In practical terms, this usually means eating a lot less protein at dinner and a lot more protein at breakfast.

http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/health-fitness/healthy-eating/how-to-build-more-muscle-with-less-protein

ergophobe

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I thought this had been debunked in recent years

Travoli

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Semi-related: You may want to research BCAAs (branch-chain amino acids). Supposed to help prevent muscle breakdown.

littleman

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>In practical terms, this usually means eating a lot less protein at dinner and a lot more protein at breakfast.

Yeah.  Then there's this:

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Older adults may need to double up on the recommended daily allowance of protein to efficiently maintain and build muscle. Current US recommendations for daily dietary protein intake are 0.8 grams/kilogram of body weight (roughly 62 g of protein per day for a 170-pound person).
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150130121613.htm

So, get use to protein for your first meal!  Not a problem for me  :).

nffc

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Mackin USA

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Animal Protein 57%
Mr. Mackin
MikeMackin@affiliatemanager.com

Rumbas

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>bcaa

Are BCAAs a Waste of Money?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfMgUABeO9c

rcjordan

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nffc's article:

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Total daily protein intake was about 1.5g/kg/d. This is nicely in line with protein recommendations for athletes, which are about 1.3-1.8g/kg/d

IIRC, protein for general diets is 0.6g/kg/d

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This suggests that bigger guys may not need more protein than smaller guys. Therefore, expressing protein recommendations as an absolute amount (e.g. 120g/d) might be more accurate than recommendations expressed per kilogram of bodyweight.

>per meal

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Protein intake was below the recommended 20g or 58% of athletes at breakfast, 36% at lunch, and 8% at dinner. Keep in mind that the recommended 20g is based on high-quality protein, while the lower quality plant-based protein contributed about half of the protein at breakfast and lunch. On the other hand, protein intake was underreported by about 25%. So the majority of athletes hit 20g of protein at their main meals, but protein intake at breakfast is at risk of being somewhat low and/or low in protein quality for some athletes.

ergophobe

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rcjordan

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>Great read

What's your target for g/kg/d ??

littleman

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One final caveat: Most of this research presumes that the protein in question is high-quality protein, namely, lean meat, fish, poultry, dairy, eggs, or whey protein powder. If you’re getting your protein from plant sources such as legumes, nuts, and grains, it may take significantly more than 25 to 30 grams of protein at a meal to maximize protein synthesis.

I think it is worth noting that getting to that level of protein via just plant sources isn't easy.  If you rely on soy sources you should be concerned with phytoestrogens, with nuts you are going to be eating a lot of extra calories.  You could rely on isolated protein powders, but I tend not to trust powders to always be what they claim.

On a different note, if you do go over 30 grams in a single meal and your body does end up using it for fuel it isn't really a bad thing.  Unlike carbs or fat, protein has a 20% overhead when used for fuel.  That metabolic expense tends to be an appetite suppressant and keeps you satiated.

ergophobe

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>Great read

What's your target for g/kg/d ??

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that level of protein via just plant sources isn't easy

More. I really don't measure. So target protein is usually simply "more" or, if highly active, "a lot more." Target calories varies from "a little less" to "a little more."

For the last week, I've been putting in a retaining wall. I moved 20 tons of gravel slightly uphill (with some help from a friend, so probably personally moved 15 tons), about 5 tons of dirt and I have 4 tons of gravel and 5 tons of brick to go. Plus on my "off" day, I did a 24-mile mountain bike ride with 5,000 feet of vertical. So in times like this, I just try to throw down at least a couple of protein shakes a day plus whatever I get through food and I supplement with ice cream just to be sure I'm not getting ice-cream deficient, which I find leads to all manner of mental health and marital problems.

>>protein powders

For better or worse, there is not a single high-quality protein that I have ever really enjoyed going back to childhood. I was that kid who never wanted steak, chicken, eggs. Fish made me gag (and strangely, the *smell* of tomatoes would take my appetite away). If I ate meat, my preference was Slim Jims, highly processed sausages, etc. And since 19 or 20, I've been a vegetarian, so there are many high-quality proteins I just wouldn't eat whether I enjoyed them or not.

I was doing a LOT of whey powders, but they don't agree with me that well anymore. I started looking for alternatives and came across some articles about NFL defensive lineman and vegan David Carter
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000711369/article/nfl-veganism-david-carter-griff-whalen-have-broken-the-mold
http://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/08/chicago-bears-david-carter-vegan-diet

Short version: almost every plant source is short on BCAAs and/or lysine. If you mix rice protein with pea protein, you get an amino acid profile similar to whey. Pea is a "medium fast" protein whereas whey is a fast protein (and casein is a medium slow protein). No phytoestrogens (or at least not compared to soy).

So I lace my morning breakfast with rice/pea and try to do a shake before bed and otherwise, don't pay that much attention to protein. I do like that Quorn stuff that gm66 mentioned, but honestly, I haven't added up the grams.

buckworks

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martinibuster

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It's not just protein.

It's the portion sizes of everything.