Author Topic: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness  (Read 6255 times)

littleman

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #120 on: June 27, 2019, 05:03:04 AM »
I'm in South Tahoe this week.  It is very nice here, lots of blooming wild flowers and still some snow in the shade of the mountains.

That's an amazing week Ergo.  I could see why you live up in the higher elevation.

ergophobe

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #121 on: June 27, 2019, 04:40:34 PM »
>>lots of blooming wild flowers

Nice! Yes, there are compensations for all the other things (fires, power outages, etc).

Did something today I've been wanting to do for a few years - parked my car part way to work and ran forest service roads to work for my "commute." Woudl have been more fun if I had started 15 minutes early, as I was a little worried about being late for a meeting (that was ultimately cancelled anyway).

littleman

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #122 on: July 01, 2019, 03:44:05 AM »
>compensations

This was the view from the place I was staying.  We live in a beautiful state.

I did four hikes and two gym sessions this week.

Drastic

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #123 on: July 01, 2019, 12:50:30 PM »
Purty.

6 this week. 5x gym plus a couple hours of open play yesterday.

littleman

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #124 on: July 01, 2019, 06:24:46 PM »
Nice Dras, that's a lot of exercise.

Drastic

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #125 on: July 01, 2019, 06:53:48 PM »
Yeah man, I'm really digging it. The more I do, the better I feel which makes me want to do more. My knee gave me some problems for a while but I think it may be sorted now.

Nice hikes there. We keep talking about doing it.

ergophobe

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #126 on: July 02, 2019, 03:16:52 PM »
Nice guys!

Significantly lazier last week. Other than the commute run, I did a bit of bouldering and that was it. Have had family in town much of the time, so mostly strolling around on easy hikes with my dad (who turns 90 in less than a month and is coming here from sea level - going uphill at 7,000 feet has him pretty winded, so we aren't moving real fast, but hey, at 90, he's still walking about miles or trail with us every day).

Drastic

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #127 on: July 02, 2019, 04:21:49 PM »
Damn that's excellent for 90! Hell my dad ain't even pushing 80 yet and I can't get him to do anything but sit outside to smoke cigars and drink whiskey.

ergophobe

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #128 on: July 04, 2019, 12:04:42 AM »
he's still walking about miles or trail with us every day).

Meant to say "he's still walking about three miles on trail with us."

Walking isn't his strong suit anymore. He'd do better if I had put him to work on gardening or construction. He doesn't take a single medication. But yes, I am hoping I have some of those genes.

littleman

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #129 on: July 04, 2019, 12:42:08 AM »
That's really is great.  My dad has pretty much all the symptoms of metabolic syndrome and can hardly walk anymore, he's about to turn 75.  I don't mean to post a downer, but I do try to keep his condition in mind as I think about my health.

ergophobe

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #130 on: July 10, 2019, 12:21:17 AM »
Decent week - two hilly runs of 7 and 8 miles, a bit of weightlifting, a tiny bit of bouldering on my backyard wall and helped a friend move, cut and grind 3600 pounds of steel.

Had an all time bear sighting the first run. I was running along the trail and a 25-30 pound cub walked across the trail about 100 feet in front of me from right to left. No sign of mom, so I stopped to wait, but she still didn't come, so I assumed baby was following her, rather than the other way around. I looped off trail to the right around a small hill, making plenty of noise but staying out of sight of where the mom was (I wanted her to hear me, but not see me). Then I crept around the hill and saw mom, reared back on her haunches (that is standing sort of upright) with her ears twitching this way and that and her nose sniffling and her eyes searching. She was on high alert, but still couldn't see me through the bushes. I walked out of sight again and came up on the trail about 100 feet away from her. She went back down on all fours and kept watching me and, as I backed away, decided I was no threat and went back to eating flowers with baby bear.

That is the first time I've ever seen a bear rear up like that in dozens (probably well over 100) bear sightings. I knew from reading that this not an aggressive pose, like you might see in an old movie, but an information gathering position, but it was really fun to see in action.

And BTW, any time you see a bear walking on its hind legs in a movie or circus, know that bear has most likelyy been tortured. They have typically been chained in a stress position similar to the torture positions in the CIA rendition sites. A wild bear rears back onto it's haunches and gets tall, but doesn't typically stand on it's hind legs unless it has some other problem (e.g. the famous bear in New Jersey that had injured forelegs).
« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 12:24:03 AM by ergophobe »

littleman

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #131 on: July 10, 2019, 01:34:08 AM »
>but it was really fun to see in action.

I think I'd find that more terrifying than fun, but I suppose that you've been conditioned over the years.

4/4 gym workouts and a little walking with the kids for me.

Drastic

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #132 on: July 10, 2019, 11:43:23 AM »
Exciting exercise session there ergo.

I was only able to get 4 gym sessions in due to the holiday, no gym access on Thurs or Sat. One vball session = 5 total.

ergophobe

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #133 on: July 10, 2019, 09:43:03 PM »
more terrifying than fun

Mmm... basically, 50 meters is a safe distance. 100 feet is slightly close, but the fact that as soon as she saw me, mom went back to eating tells you the distance was safe.

I have been bluff charged a few times where a mother with cubs runs at you, stops about 10 meters away and snorts and stamps. I had assumed that fear was causing me to exaggerate how close she got, but one time I went back to the spot where it happened and studied it and realized how close she really was. Then I was even more scared.

I try to keep my distance, but sometimes you don't see them in the underbrush. My closest encounter was coming around a bush on a wide trail (road actually) with good visibility, but the bear was coming around the bush from off the trail and we were about five feet away when we saw each other and both trotting towards each other. By the time I could bring myself to a stop, he was already five strides away. Their athleticism is incredible. One time I spooked one and it went 15 feet up a tree before I could even stop. When he looked down and saw it was just a human, he literally pushed off from the tree, did a half twist in the air, landed on all fours and walked up the hill.

All that said, black bears are not hunters. If you give them space to get away, they will choose to get away unless they have been habituated to people (so bears in the wild are a lot less dangerous than bears that frequent campsites).

Mountain lions, on the other hand... I am genuinely scared of them.

ergophobe

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Re: Core continuing commitment to health and fitness
« Reply #134 on: July 10, 2019, 09:46:02 PM »
BTW, I am also now scared of driving in the Bay Area, in a way that I wasn't when I lived there. I'm also not particularly comfortable walking through most cities at night.

It's all a function of what you get used to.

Quote
Black bears have killed 61 people across North America since 1900.  This no longer worries me. My chances of being killed by a domestic dog, bees, or lightning are vastly greater. My chances of being murdered are 60,000 times greater.  One of the safest places a person can be is in the woods.
https://bear.org/how-dangerous-are-black-bears/

The total death count from bears since 1900 is less than the annual death count due to lawnmowers. I don't own one of the latter. Much too risky ;-)
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5191701/More-Americans-killed-LAWNMOWERS-Jihadi-terrorists.html

I feel safer with those jihadi bears than with those cars and lawnmowers :-)

« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 09:51:55 PM by ergophobe »