Author Topic: Eliud Kipchoge breaks 2-hour marathon barrier  (Read 1176 times)

ergophobe

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Eliud Kipchoge breaks 2-hour marathon barrier
« on: October 20, 2019, 08:44:33 PM »
Not that long ago, an Australian data analysis suggested that we wouldn't see a sub-2 marathon before 2050. Now it looks likely as Eliud Kipchoge just ran a marathon distance in under 2 hours. Incredible!

https://www.runnersworld.com/news/a29430499/eliud-kipchoge-ineos-159-challenge-result/

This doesn't count as a world record because
 - he ran with a phalanx of pacers who broke the wind - a total of 41 pacers running in a seven-man echelon formation with Kipchoge in the draft
 - he had a laser dot projected on the road to show exactly where he had to be to hit the sub-2 pace
 - he had people on bikes who handed him small drinks (50ml) at about seven-minute intervals, roughly double the frequency you would get in an actual race.

Still, the guy ran a 4:34 mile (2:50km) for an entire marathon. Mind blowing.

rcjordan

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Re: Eliud Kipchoge breaks 2-hour marathon barrier
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2020, 10:20:59 PM »
...and he had special shoes that are likely to be banned

"The Vaporfly's foam-packed, carbon-fiber plate captures "more of the energy in each footfall and propel the runner forward with every step," says Quartz, while the New York Times points to the 36-millimeter insole, which is 5 millimeters higher "

Nike Nailed It With These Shoes—and That's a Problem
https://www.newser.com/story/285751/these-nike-shoes-might-just-get-banned.html

ergophobe

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Re: Eliud Kipchoge breaks 2-hour marathon barrier
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2020, 01:13:07 AM »
Well, there were many factors aside from the shoes that would not be allowed in a real race. But yes, the shoes were the most controversial one.

It's an area for debate. If shoes that cushion the foot are allowed, should shoes with a carbon fiber shank be allowed?

Auto racing, swimming, biking and skiing (just to name the ones that come immediately to mind) have had to deal with similar issues where equipment advanced faster than the culture was willing to accept and rules had to be put in place. In skiing and auto racing, it was mostly with safety in mind. Swimming is the closest analogy in that there was a worry that only one company would be able to supply gear to top athletes.

We'll see how this shakes out with the shoes.

This issue is, at what point is it a shoe, and at what point is it more like the blades that made Oscar Pistorius 25-30% more efficient than a runner with lower legs? They will have to draw the line somewhere, but nobody knows where. But it sounds like World Athletics is about to make a ruling.