Author Topic: <THIS!!> When Evidence Says No, But Doctors Say Yes  (Read 2950 times)

ergophobe

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Re: <THIS!!> When Evidence Says No, But Doctors Say Yes
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2017, 04:31:35 PM »
OK... last post before I get banned for spamming...

I was really hoping that Theranos would live up to its promise and not turn out to be a fraud, because where the real benefits would accrue is if you easily and cheaply obtain an annual blood panel that would measure levels of hundreds of markers and then figure out what's happening your body. Then we could target areas where we are deficient.

Personally, I was suffering from something and thought anemia was one possible cause. Took some iron supplementation and it went away. Kept taking it. A year later, when I had a physical, my iron levels were deemed too high (slightly outside of normal range), which can also have negative health consequences. I bet there would be health benefits from doing this right and supplementing in the case of true deficiency.

BTW - many of the benefits of vitamins are based on epidemiological studies comparing deficient to normal, not comparing normal to supplemented.

rcjordan

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Re: <THIS!!> When Evidence Says No, But Doctors Say Yes
« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2017, 04:53:40 PM »
>antioxidants thread

Ginger thread, IIRC.

Travoli and I discussed this at our last dinner, but I didn't express myself very well.  I am a confirmed, die-hard megalomaniac, but if I had to realistically pick a single trait in which I seem to excel, it would be 'diagnostics.' I'm good at this and it underlies much of my success across a lot of fields, ranging from auto repair to building to programming.  I self-experiment on a broad range of things that pique my interest, but health is always on the front. Over the long term, I've had a lot of false-positives that end up being weeded out but the mile-high view is that I've been pretty successful with picking things that work.

Self-experimentation as a source of new ideas: Ten examples about sleep, mood, health, and weight
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioral-and-brain-sciences/article/selfexperimentation-as-a-source-of-new-ideas-ten-examples-about-sleep-mood-health-and-weight/611A4E991721C5A12C5BF62DE9B6AFDF

rcjordan

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Re: <THIS!!> When Evidence Says No, But Doctors Say Yes
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2017, 04:58:27 PM »
<added>

I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. --Thomas Edison

Rumbas

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Re: <THIS!!> When Evidence Says No, But Doctors Say Yes
« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2017, 12:46:39 PM »
>To me, popping vitamins is mostly a legacy of 20th-century optimism

Agreed. Heard that several times over the last years.