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Author Topic: NFL to become NTFL  (Read 2379 times)
rcjordan
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« on: August 19, 2011, 08:29:15 PM »

National Touch Football League


McMahon, ex-players sue NFL, claim negligence over concussions
http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/story/15450124/mcmahon-former-players-sue-nfl-over-concussions

<added>
I went back and found this Guardian article from a month ago. Take a look at the video

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2011/jul/19/nfl-star-brain-injuries-destroyed
« Last Edit: August 19, 2011, 08:35:29 PM by rcjordan » Logged
grnidone
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2011, 03:14:02 AM »

I can see this more affecting high school sports than professional sports.  

Think of the lawsuits this will bring up...high schools won't be able to pay for the insurance to have regular football played.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2011, 03:16:31 AM by grnidone » Logged
rcjordan
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2017, 09:45:32 PM »

[update]

The latest brain study examined 111 former NFL players. Only one didnít have CTE.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/the-latest-brain-study-examined-111-former-nfl-players-only-one-didnt-have-cte/2017/07/25/835b49e4-70bc-11e7-8839-ec48ec4cae25_story.html
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Drastic
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2017, 01:12:20 AM »

I dunno rc...NFL has deep, deep lawyers.

I wonder why that cbs article is now 404.

Don't get me wrong, I think all spectator sports are dying in the US, to some degree. This may speed things along, but it's already (going to be) dead, Jim.
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rcjordan
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2017, 02:05:45 AM »

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[Congress's] investigation has shown that while the NFL had been publicly proclaiming its role as the founder and accelerator of important research, it was privately attempting to influence that research," the study said. "The NFL attempted to use its 'unrestricted gift' as leverage to steer funding away from critics.

https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/nfl-ending-partnership-with-the-national-institute-of-health-on-concussion-study/
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littleman
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« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2017, 07:12:29 AM »

In the long run football and probably rugby will die; no responsible parent will be wanting their boy to do something that causes brain damage.  It may take a while though for the reconcile to happen though.
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Brad
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« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2017, 11:09:55 AM »

In the long run football and probably rugby will die; no responsible parent will be wanting their boy to do something that causes brain damage.  It may take a while though for the reconcile to happen though.

This has been my prediction on football.  It will take a generation or two but you will start to see football being downgraded and eventually dropped on a high school level.  It will come from the insurance companies and lawyers making it increasingly costly to maintain the sport on an amateur level.
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rcjordan
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« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2017, 12:13:39 PM »

>insurance companies and lawyers

Good point. A couple of stiff verdicts against school districts and they'll pull the plug.

>parents

There a a lot of them in denial, though. They be clinging to the programs until the lawyers close them down.
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« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2017, 06:08:00 PM »

I'm not so sure, been deaths in the boxing ring forever still going. I think if you would ask *almost* any ex-pro NFL player that knowing what they know now what would they do, 99.9% would say "the same".

Here is the opinion of one of the best players to play the game https://youtu.be/yuhtGkomjA8?t=108
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rcjordan
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« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2017, 09:15:57 PM »

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The most expensive keyword term for 2014, 'mesothelioma attorneys tx', had an average cost per click of $319.34. The other 12 mesothelioma-related keywords in the Top 20 averaged a $216.17 cost per click.

It won't matter what the players think.
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« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2017, 09:37:19 PM »

>no responsible parent

But those players make millions. A few celebrity years are attractive to poor families with nothing to lose. And there is so much money to be made by so many people. It forms a gravitational field.

I wonder if football could actually become more violent, with crowds cheering louder for bigger hits? Full circle to Rome.





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rcjordan
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« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2017, 10:41:50 PM »

> so much money to be made

I agree to an extent. First, there's the denial group (like those who smoke) that think they're somehow immune. Then there's the fame-and-fortune group (like those who play the lottery --though the lottery odds may be more favorable). And there's currently not much more than a correlation with the sport. At this stage it feels a lot like the early years of the tobacco-cancer or asbestos wars, but there's definitely a small trickle of blood in the water. It's going to take a few more years to gain critical mass. If the lawyers gut the school sports programs it won't matter what a parent thinks, their kid will be playing badminton.
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rcjordan
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« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2017, 10:47:50 PM »

>trickle of blood

I went on a quick search after the above post.

http://nypost.com/2016/03/08/pop-warner-football-settles-concussion-lawsuit/

Gearing up already:
https://pricebenowitz.com/blog/can-sue-school-athletic-organization-childs-sports-injury
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Brad
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« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2017, 12:20:42 PM »

It be erosion from the bottom up: Pop Warner, small rural high schools that can barely afford any athletic program, up the food chain to wealthier high schools and on to universities.   Most of these do not have deep pockets with all the tax cuts, tax caps, and other financial pressures.  But these are the training grounds for pro football without them feeding trained talent to the next level above the game will suffer.  There is big money at the pro and part of the college levels of the game but not so much at high schools and colleges not famous for football.

It is going to take time.  Local high schools have spent huge sums of money over the last 30 years building football fields that are far fancier than many small universities. 
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ergophobe
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« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2017, 04:46:19 PM »

It be erosion from the bottom up

From the bottom up agewise and from the top down socially. My dad was a college football coach and then athletic director. One of the things he used to say is that if you look at "tough" sports, they tend to be dominated by people with fewer options. Someone mentioned boxing, and he used to like to argue that the reason so many great boxers were Irish and Italian and that's not true anymore is not because Irish and Italians don't have the genetics to compete against Hispanics and African-Americans in boxing, but they don't have the need to get punched in the face to make a living.

He made a similar argument about quarterbacks versus linebackers.

I think what you'll see is that wealthier families, who are saving for college for their kids and are counting on sports to keep their kid rounded and education to keep their kid employed, will start pushing their kids away from football. I see it already in terms of soccer (aka "real football" for the non-US audience following along) becoming the preferred sport of the upper middle and wealthy classes on the coasts. And despite some fear-mongering, it is almost certainly a lot safer

 - https://sports.vice.com/en_us/article/qkyyv3/the-study-on-cte-in-soccer-is-not-what-you-think-it-is

Plus, I see an evolution of sports perception anyway. When I was a high-school rock climber, this was an absolute geek sport. Nobody could name a climber they didn't know personally. It was not considered a sport at all and those who climbed were not considered athletes in any way. It was just some weird sort of camping for asocial nerds (maybe I'm exaggerating a bit, but I barely remember anyone even asking me about climbing or being in the least curious when I was a teenager).

Now I have a co-worker who told me she wants to have Tommy Caldwell's babies (which is funny, because Tommy is a friend and as humble, relaxed and geeky guy as you could imagine) and Dean Potter had all kinds of groupies (though also a neighbor and as nice a guy as you could meet). I think there are a lot of activities that have been around a long time as "nerd fringe" that are now "cool" and semi-mainstream.

More and more, I think the "cool" kids in a high school are the ones *not* playing football. May be different in the Midwest and Texas, but it's already true in a lot of the country.
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