Author Topic: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer  (Read 690 times)

grnidone

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One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« on: January 08, 2019, 03:57:47 PM »
I've become much less bitter about California.  I won't live there again.  I endured it for 2 years and 16 days, and that's enough for me.

This guy's story reminded me why I'll never go back.

Quote
It was fun because I could afford it and because I was part of the class that benefited from the system. I canít help wondering though that the only reason Silicon Valley and the Bay Area has been so prosperous is because itís in a country where generally people are comfortable with having so much wealth, while having so many people live under the poverty line.

https://evertpot.com/a-look-back-at-sf/

ergophobe

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2019, 07:35:45 PM »
I've become much less bitter about California.  I won't live there again.  I endured it for 2 years and 16 days, and that's enough for me.

I feel compelled to point out that California is 3.25 times the size of England. It's roughly the size of Italy, Switzerland and Austria combined. Rural California is much bigger than rural Kansas and has slightly more cropland and the same amount of grazing land. Where I live, you are far more likely to meet a rancher than a programmer.  You're far more likely to meet someone who drives a backhoe than someone who drives a Tesla.

Of course, it's not for everyone. A co-worker just quit after a year (mostly job reasons) and asked her fiance, if he could live anywhere, where would he live? He said back to Kansas City. They're back in Kansas now.

Me, I spent about 5 years total in Wisconsin (4, then a few years in Switzerland, then another 9 months in WI). That last year in particular was brutal. When I got the chance, I finished work, packed the car and left town at almost midnight, intent on crossing the state line before I slept and getting out of the Midwest as soon as I could.

Sort of like you, I'm less bitter about my time in the Midwest many years on, but I don't think I could ever go back either. Much happier in California. Immeasurably so, I would say.

littleman

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2019, 09:43:05 PM »
Quote
I've become much less bitter about California.

I don't think so.

martinibuster

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2019, 11:51:55 PM »
I was born in San Francisco. So I've seen what it used to be like in the 60's, 70's, 80's and early 90's. So I have strong personal feelings about what happened to my city.

Let me tell you, it was an oasis of beauty, cool, of great ideas, good sex, bad sex, everything that makes the difference between living and simply existing to consume.

San Francisco used to be a great home for normal people and for misfits, musicians, visual artists, video artists, poets and so on. The living was easy. It was cheap and lots of great cheap food.

I know I'm a part of this industry but I am also a San Francisco native. I was working where I already lived. I am not nor ever was a part of the wave that killed SF. I was simply working where I already lived.

So I'm in New England now and loving it. 





« Last Edit: January 08, 2019, 11:57:08 PM by martinibuster »

aaron

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2019, 06:21:33 AM »
Quote
lots of great cheap food.
If you are willing to walk this is still true. :)

Huge portion sizes, low prices & great meatz @ spots like http://www.taquerialoscoyotes.com

martinibuster

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2019, 06:47:34 AM »
Quote
lots of great cheap food.
If you are willing to walk this is still true. :)

Huge portion sizes, low prices & great meatz @ spots like http://www.taquerialoscoyotes.com

Nice! :)

The ethnic food in the SF Bay Area was my big thing. I went to many of the expensive and famous places but it was always the ethnic restaurants that won my heart!

littleman

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2019, 07:36:48 AM »
I agree that there are still great places in SF to eat, but I can take you a short drive East or South of SF and blow your mind with what you could eat for under $15 -- Indian, Thai, Chinese, Peruvian, Mexican, Cuban and so much more.  I'd argue that the rest of the Bay Area has more bargains and real diversity than The City these days.  There's a Uyghurs restaurant in Union City I've been wanting to try.

This glorious meal is only $12, from a local Taqueria.

martinibuster

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2019, 06:56:47 AM »
littleman, it's been that way for a couple decades now. I can believe the trend has only intensified.

In the 1980's and early 90's there were still good hole in the walls in SF but that hit a brick wall at the end of the 90's. I used to eat at a Korean restaurant in SF, a block away, that did the whole complementary appetizer spread before your meal arrived, with the mung beans, sprouts and tiny fried anchovies.

When I lived in the East Bay in the early 2000's, Oakland's Chinatown used to be a wonderland for dim sum, especially when they had a street festival going on!

littleman

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2019, 08:07:14 AM »
So, how is New England for food in your opinion?  I am sure it is a lot better than the fly-over states.

ergophobe

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2019, 10:06:54 PM »
This glorious meal is only $12, from a local Taqueria.

After my first meal at the famous Ahwahnee Hotel (count on $60 for vegetarian, $75 for meat; more if you want a nice wine. Some of my meals there have been over $200/person - I didn't pay that of course), someone asked how it was. I said, "Well, off the top of my head, I can name 10 places in Berkeley where I could eat better than that for $12."

I guess that's still true.

And for the record, I don't like cities, but as cities go, Berkeley was a great place to live 1996-2003.

littleman

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2019, 10:18:48 PM »
I totally agree with that sentiment.  I may not have a sophisticated pallet, but I can honestly tell you that I've never enjoyed a high end meal as much as meals from those family run restaurants in the lower rent parts of the bay.

martinibuster

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2019, 06:34:01 AM »
Ethnic food in New England is great. The only thing is that ethnic means Polish, German, Pizza and Czech.

Near me I have a great pizza restaurant. I've eaten at the top restaurants in New York and New Haven, as well as San Francisco/Oakland/Berkeley. I have a good idea of good pizza. This place in Northampton is the real deal, particularly their grilled mushroom pizza.

After that it's about the smoked meats. I can get smoked kielbasa, polish meat in pastry thingies, smoked chicken, smoked franks, locally made sausages and so on. I can even get a freshly slaughtered baby goat if I make inquiries. Baby goat chops with a chimichuri sauce is great.  There's a place that gets ox tail fresh from the farm. The butcher has pulled it out and waved it about like a whip then chopped the meatiest bits for me.

Then there's New York Halal Cart Chicken. Wow. Luckily we have a New Yorker out here who has a cart in town, authentic.

New England has the west coast beat for sandwiches, hands down. There is no contest. Around here they're called Grinders. Even the lowly cheesteak from a local supermarket beats almost any sandwich I've ever eaten in the SF Bay Area.

The only place I've ever had a great sandwich was at BiRite supermarket on 18th street in SF. They had an Italian meatloaf sandwich and also a cuban pulled pork that were to die for.

Oh wait, there's one more place with good sammies. It's called La Torta Sabrosa, a Mexican Torta restaurant on Grand Avenue in South San Francisco. Geez, that torta was so good that, while driving back to Oakland with it, the smell was so good that I had to pull off the road to take a bite. It was so good I ate it right there parked at the curb.

Chicken cutlet grinders, Italian grinders, Chicken Parm grinders and even a cheeseburger grinder. In some places around here the grinders are sublime.

In the summer it's all about the seafood shacks. Bill in Japan probably knows what I'm talking about.

Whole belly clams! Connecticut lobster roll, Maine lobster salad roll, and scallop rolls. 

There are I think three kinds of clam chowder. There's the red Manhattan chowder, the creamy chowder everyone knows and  then there's the clear broth style that doesn't have any cream (my favorite).

Ipswich, Massachusetts is the home of fried clams. The Clam Box is a mecca for that kind of food. Reds in Maine, The Clam Box, Captain Scotts, these are all like the Gracelands of seafood shacks.

Some of the seafood shacks sell french fries that'll blow your socks off. I don't know how they do it but they have little blisters around the outside that make them crunchy. Maybe they dust them in cornstarch? I don't know.

Then there's raw oysters. Wellfleet oysters are amazing good.  There are oysters from Connecticut that are very good too.

Maine lobster rolls from a certain two restaurants are sublime. They make you do that orgasmic "Oh!, Oh!" sound while you eat them sound.  (Red's Eats or Spragues Lobster).  In Maine the rolls have just a small amount of mayo, just a touch.

In Connecticut there's a restaurant called Abbots where the lobster is so fresh that it's still alive when you're placing your order.  CT style hot lobster roll doesn't have mayo. It's just the meat and some butter between two pieces of bread. Hot lobster rolls in CT are affectionately called Hot Lobbies.

Lastly, there's smoked bluefish, stuffed clams, lemon pepper smoked salmon, German cakes and so on.

There's good food but you have to know where to go.  And you know what? I haven't even begun exploring Rhode Island. The first stop is an Italian pizzeria that makes pizza with house made dough and with buffalo mozzarella from Italy.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2019, 06:51:32 AM by martinibuster »

littleman

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Re: One year in San Francisco as a Software Engineer
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2019, 02:20:56 AM »
Man, that all sounds really good.  I love lobster, oysters and clam chowder.