Author Topic: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)  (Read 16942 times)

Brad

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #45 on: November 19, 2020, 10:22:04 PM »
> How to do Nothing

I don't need a book for this.  I could write the book but that would interrupt my Stillness.

ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #46 on: November 20, 2020, 12:22:59 AM »
Well, the full title is "How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy," and it was the latter part that I was interested in. I'm pretty good at doing nothing and, compared to most, resisting the attention economy. But I think it's an important topic.

"People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing all day long."
  -- Pooh Bear

buckworks

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #47 on: January 22, 2021, 07:21:52 PM »
I got a statement from Audible that I listened for 880 hours in 2020 ... roughly twice the previous year.

I'm not sure if that allowed for the fact that I often listen at increased speed.

Most of it was non-fiction.

ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #48 on: January 22, 2021, 08:30:11 PM »
I often listen at increased speed.

You mentioned that before. My brain doesn't work fast enough for that. I like the cadence of the normal human voice and I generally read about as fast as a good reader reads aloud. The only book I listened to sped up was the multi-volume biography of Theodore Roosevelt.

ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2021, 08:07:26 PM »
>> Caitlin Doughty

That's the one. It taught me some new things and her writing style is way above average.

https://freakonomics.com/podcast/book-club-caitlin-doughty

Rupert

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #50 on: March 09, 2021, 07:11:43 AM »
Ok Long shot as I have littlel time.  I have a godson who is suddenly 21 years old. He is a bright lad, studied Business and Philosophy at Uni in London, and I need to get him a keepsake.

I usually get a flask with an inspirational thought on it, Like: 

But Charlie is not a Whisky or Brandy drinker, so it does not work.

I talked to his Mum, and we agreed on an inspirational book.  Great idea but now I am lost :) 
I am thinking:

 The Greatest Salesman in the World by Og Mandino

As a recommended idea, and will be listening to it over the next couple of days.  I also thought of Shantaram, as a 21-year-old will see a side of life and people he won't of come across yet.

Ideas?
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ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #51 on: March 09, 2021, 03:54:55 PM »
Hmm.... inspirational is not one of my genres :-)

The Og Mandigo, Paul Coelho books just leave me a bit cold.

And my reading list at 21 was mostly Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, mystical literature (east and west), etc. But then, I majored in religion, not business. So I was more moved by Be Here Now.

How about
 - Tales of the Otori by Lian Hearn
 - Unbreakable or Seabisquit by Laura Hillenbrand
 - Next of Kin, by Roger Fouts
 - The War of Art by Steven Pressfield (and his others like Do the Work).
 - With the Old Breed (if he would find a soldier's story inspiring)
 - Boys in the Boat, about the 1936 rowing team that won the gold in Munich
 - Ultramarathon Man, if he's a runner
 - I Heard the Owl Call My Name if he has a spritual bent

Without knowing him, I would say...

If he has aspirations of being a creator of some sort, Pressfield.
If you want a fictional story of a young person who overcomes the odds, Tales of the Otori
If you want a non-fictional story of a young person who overcomes the odds, Boys in the Boat or Unbreakable
If you want a book that's funny and inspiring, Ultramarathon Man

Maybe if I rest on it, others will come to mind.

Rupert

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #52 on: March 09, 2021, 05:57:58 PM »
Ah, wonderful thx.  I should say a bit more about him, as you have pointed out some holes in my request.

He is pretty happy go luck.. grounded.  At 17 he decided to pedal around Iceland... alone (Big brother did 2000 miles down the west coast of the USA from Seattle down when he was 17.)

Dads an old mate of mine, who has done VERY well in the RAF (MBE) Air Commodore or something.  So Charlie went to private school, as Dad was travelling about in those days. So well read.

I was thinking about a climbing book.
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ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #53 on: March 09, 2021, 06:19:12 PM »
In that case, from my list, I would pick Ultramarathon Man or Boys in the Boat.

I'm not going to be able to help much with climbing literature. I honestly find most of it boring. The only one that I really enjoyed was Bonatti's Great Days, now out of print. That's
https://www.amazon.com/Great-Days-Walter-Bonatti/dp/0575018151

I guess I was carried along by Joe Simpson's first book, which I read in French as La Mort Suspendue, a much worse title than Touching the Void and perhaps the book as a whole suffered for reading it in French. I read an interview with him where he said that the real challenge of that book was figuring out how to make it interesting to describe what was mostly five days of crawling where the reader already knows he survives, since it's autobiographical. That, I think, is the challenge of any mountaineering literature.

I liked Hans Florine's book, but that one is very close to home so I am a biased judge in that case.

Rupert

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #54 on: March 09, 2021, 07:40:04 PM »
Yes he has read "Touching the Void", and "Left for Dead " Nick Ward, his Dad is a sailor.  Both great Yarns.

Bonatti can go on my shelf if not his I think. So Ultramarathon Man or Boys in the Boat.... Thanks, I don't think I will read them in time, but see what I can do :)
... Make sure you live before you die.

ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #55 on: March 09, 2021, 08:31:25 PM »
I love Ultramarathon Man and it is funny. It's a quick read.

Boys in the Boat is a longer read, but my brother, father, wife, sisters and I all enjoyed it and, despite being from the same family, that spans a lot of ages, viewpoints, physical abilities and so forth.

A bit like Touching the Void, it's sort of ridiculous. The title gives away the ending, and yet during the race scenes it's just gripping and my wife and I couldn't stop. But I mentioned it because it's also about young men from rural America during the Depression, centered on one in particular who was abandoned by his family at something like age 10 and left to fend for himself, facing great hardship and, with just a fraction of the resources of the top teams and no standout star rower, who through finding the magic of a team that works well together, end up defeating every other team in the world, including the well-funded blue blood teams of Harvard and Oxford and so forth, not to mention the German national team at the Nazis' showcase Olympics.

BTW, it makes a nice set with Unbroken, since Zamparini (sp) competes at the same Olympics. Though Unbroken was the runaway bestseller, I found Boys in the Boat more gripping. Unbroken is staggering though.

Rupert

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #56 on: March 11, 2021, 06:31:18 AM »
Again thank you.
I have decided to give him a leather-bound journal, with a foreword by me, and 2 of your recommendations in the forward.  I decided, in the end, I had to give him a book I have read, and as I cannot possibly read them in time, they could be recommendations on his reading list, but not gifts.
 
The journal I hope will inspire him, as he hopefully fills it with quotes (Started him off with a few) poetry, life thoughts and travels.

I have also given him the Greatest Salesman in the World, as I enjoyed it, and after all, whether we like it or not we sell ourselves every day! Hope he likes them :)

 
... Make sure you live before you die.

ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #57 on: March 11, 2021, 09:29:47 PM »
>>I had to give him a book I have read

I guess that's true. If it's to be a meaningful gift it should be a book that is meaningful to you first and foremost, because it is impossible to predict what will be meaningful to someone else.

buckworks

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #58 on: January 11, 2023, 02:58:37 PM »
I started listening to Prince Harry's book Spare as soon as I was able to download it yesterday.

I've enjoyed it so far (first third). The writing is good (helped by a ghostwriter) and Harry is an exceptionally fine reader.

One thing is clear to me ... what some of the media gossips are saying about (projecting onto!) the book is wildly different from what it actually says.

... which kinda reinforces one of his major themes ...

ergophobe

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Re: Quarantine Reading (Buckworks)
« Reply #59 on: January 11, 2023, 08:58:33 PM »
I would not have taken you for a "royals" reader... but on further reflection, I think I should have guessed you might.

After a bit of a dry spell where I've been reading books that I mostly can't recommend, I've been on a John Green kick. T's book club read The Anthropocene Reviewed, which I really liked.

Then on a recent drive we listened to The Fault in Our Stars, which we both really liked - very serious book narrated by a girl dying of cancer, with some absurdist elements thrown in that make me think of Daniel Pinkwater. It's classed as a YA novel, but it feels like that is mostly because of the age of the protagonists.

That got me to read Turtles All the Way Down. Not quite as good IMO, but I nevertheless enjoyed it.

BTW, The Anthropocene Reviewed is a series of essays that started out as podcasts. He has essays on things like Malaria, Wintry Mix, Indianapolis and each essay finishes with "I give Thing X stars." One of the essays is on how the movie Harvey fit in to an episode of depressive breakdown that nearly killed him. That prompted us to watch Harvey, and especially seeing it after Green's essay, I have to give Harvey 4.5 stars.