Author Topic: SARS coronavirus in human specimens and its sensitivity to UV irradiation  (Read 307 times)

rcjordan

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rcjordan

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Supply shipments from Amz are a PITA to disinfect because they are often wrapped in a nested, Russian doll fashion --bag within a bag within a box, etc.  Each layer has the possibility of exposure.


Amazon workers in six US warehouses reportedly test positive for COVID-19 - CNET
https://www.cnet.com/news/amazon-workers-in-six-us-warehouses-reportedly-test-positive-for-covid-19/
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 12:28:08 AM by rcjordan »

littleman

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Given that the packaging usually happens a few days before arriving at the doorstep, wouldn't a 48 hour quarantine of packages be enough in most cases to minimize the risk?

rcjordan

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I posted a study yesterday that said 72 hrs viability on paper surfaces, IIRC.

rcjordan

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<+>

Persistence of coronaviruses on inanimate surfaces and their inactivation with biocidal agents - Journal of Hospital Infection

https://www.journalofhospitalinfection.com/article/S0195-6701(20)30046-3/fulltext

ergophobe

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I posted a study yesterday that said 72 hrs viability on paper surfaces, IIRC.

I read an article with an infectious disease specialist who went over that paper and noted that while the virus was still alive on *hard* surfaces (dies quicker on absorbent surfaces) after 72 hours, it was only 0.1% of the original sample that was still alive. So yes it is still detectable in lab conditions (21C to 23C degrees IIR), but 99.9% of the original sample was dead (or whatever the proper term for a virus is).