Author Topic: Sorry, robot cranes took the jobs  (Read 645 times)

rcjordan

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Sorry, robot cranes took the jobs
« on: September 10, 2021, 10:07:26 PM »
moves 100,000 shipping containers a year between trains and trucks

“We anticipate that the direct jobs will probably be, meaning the ones on site, will probably be less than 10 employees,”

When CSX announced the Carolina Connector in July 2016, the company said the project would bring 300 on-site jobs to Rocky Mount.

Estimate of jobs at Rocky Mount cargo terminal dwindles to almost nothing

https://www.wral.com/estimate-of-jobs-at-rocky-mount-cargo-terminal-dwindles-to-almost-nothing/19868497/

ergophobe

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Re: Sorry, robot cranes took the jobs
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2021, 12:09:54 AM »
Where does Debbie say the job growth is going to be in the 2030?

rcjordan

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Re: Sorry, robot cranes took the jobs
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2021, 01:14:07 AM »
Seawall construction.

ergophobe

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Re: Sorry, robot cranes took the jobs
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2021, 05:31:50 PM »
Ha ha. I was actually thinking along the same lines. Infrastructure to deal with climate change.

But I also think that anything that is "human-centered" will dominate. So I would expect it to be easier to find a therapist job in 2039 than a programmer job or accountant job. Similar with lodging and hospitality vs trucking, though in the short term (next 15 years) there will be a huge demand for truckers and programmers, I think both of those will taper off or be redefined (i.e. a programmer will be more of an arts/creative position than an engineering position).

But who knows? One of my favorite examples is in a book by Clarke or Asimov. It's about a sprawling galactic empire and one guy is trying desperately to jump to hyperspace. They have FTL travel and comms and everything. But to make the jump, he pulls the ephemeris off the bookshelf and pulls out his slide rule and works out the calcs. It seems absurd from our perspective that you could even imagine FTL drive coming before the slide rule was obsolete, but there it is, from one of the foremost envisioners of the future.