Author Topic: CyberWar I  (Read 7162 times)

Brad

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Re: CyberWar I
« Reply #60 on: May 06, 2022, 10:33:13 PM »
There has been a surge in Russian citizens downloading VPN's so they can get around Gov't internet blocks.  Washington Post.

littleman

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Re: CyberWar I
« Reply #61 on: May 07, 2022, 04:31:45 AM »
Judging from all the fires and rail sabotages there must be a lot of people against the war.  I'm wondering if they are organized or like minded individuals acting individually.


Brad

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Re: CyberWar I
« Reply #62 on: May 07, 2022, 10:29:48 AM »
> sabotages

I've been wondering the same thing LM.  Ukraine has been building it's armed forces since 2014 and they may have very well built an extensive spy and saboteur network both inside Russia and/or ready to infiltrate Russia.  Remember the Russians tried to pull the saboteur stunt Ukraine but they didn't seem successful.

I suspect it might be a combination of both: some professional sabotage and some are acts of protest.

Here is a video of some young men inside Russia setting fire to the local Russian army recruiting office which also houses all the local military draft records.  The lads seem to know what they are doing and the one has a good pitching arm.

https://www.reddit.com/r/UkraineWarVideoReport/comments/uiydgh/russian_throws_molotov_cocktails_into_a_military/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

This seems more like individuals that see themselves getting drafted and sent in as cannon fodder and want to protest and delay that.

*******

In other news: Russia is sticking to their cover story that the naval cruiser Moscow was sunk in an accidental explosion and not from enemy action.  Therefore, relatives of dead crewmen will not get any benefits.

rcjordan

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Re: CyberWar I
« Reply #63 on: May 08, 2022, 01:18:12 AM »
Small Drones Are Giving Ukraine an Unprecedented Edge. From surveillance to search-and-rescue, consumer drones are having a huge impact on the country’s defense against Russia. (wired.com)

rcjordan

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Re: CyberWar I
« Reply #64 on: June 09, 2022, 01:17:20 PM »
Russia unexpectedly poor at cyberwar, say European military heads (straitstimes.com)

rcjordan

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Re: CyberWar I
« Reply #65 on: June 19, 2022, 06:55:54 PM »
Russia has lost hundreds of them to missiles, drones in Ukraine

Tanks' Role in Modern Warfare Is Being Questioned
https://www.newser.com/story/321915/ukraine-war-raises-questions-about-future-of-tanks.html

ergophobe

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Re: CyberWar I
« Reply #66 on: June 20, 2022, 09:31:39 PM »
Does the tank have a future? (Economist - paywall)

https://www.economist.com/interactive/international/2022/06/15/does-the-tank-have-a-future

Interactive graphics on Russian tank vulnerabilities and the general problem with tanks.

Main new info - the new anti-tank missiles go high and then come straight down on the turret, which in old tanks is lightly armored since they were not built to defend against that. Furthermore, the T-72 stores the ammunition in the crew cabin with no blast shield between the crew and the ammo, so once the missile penetrates the turret, it's bad.