Author Topic: What's wrong with SERPs today  (Read 350 times)

gm66

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Re: What's wrong with SERPs today
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2018, 02:19:00 PM »
Most people don't even use G's search ops so it may be a waste of time offering that feature.

Being an AI company i'm surprsied at G's bad natural language processing, sentences that a 6 year old could parse it fails to.

I think it would be good if you could have a seperate 'commerce search', keep it split from knowledge searches.
Civilisation is a race between disaster and education ...

aaron

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Re: What's wrong with SERPs today
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2018, 07:49:29 AM »
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Tim Mayer once told me that less than 2% of users used any advanced search features.  So, it'd be a great feature for a very few users.  Is it worth it? Maybe, if it generates buzz with the tech sites.
DuckDuckGo has done a great job of differentiating in part by marketing stuff most people don't care much about.

I'm a bit surprised it hasn't cost them the Google ad syndication partnership by now given how many studies they've done flaming Google.

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Maybe it's just the way I search, but, Wikipedia aside, I rarely see any results from the interior pages of wikis, knowledge bases or directories.  (Okay I recognize that most directories left standing are crap.)  It seems to me that the good ones are nodes of expertise.  I do see a lot of specialized forums in the G and B serps.
Through directly tracking over 1 billion end users daily, Google can see what sites users are actively looking for, how well people engage on them, and which sites people repeatedly choose to visit.

A forum is highly interactive. People actively seek them out to learn, to answer questions & to participate in some sense of community. Whereas a static directory typically doesn't add enough value & isn't differentiated enough to be a sought after destination which people seek out as an alternative to a search engine. A lot of wikis are overrun by spam or so adverse to the risk of spam that they close themselves off to edits from new users & thus die slowly each time an old user quits for whatever reason.

If you edit / write / contribute there is some sense of ownership & identity wrapped in the content consumption. If you are exclusively a reader the commitment is often much less unless you are reading things vital to work or things that confirm your identity & political outlook & such.