Author Topic: When big data classifies you according to stereotypes  (Read 314 times)

rcjordan

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When big data classifies you according to stereotypes
« on: July 12, 2018, 12:44:47 PM »
Algorithms are taking over and woe betide anyone they class as a 'deadbeat'

https://www.theguardian.com/world/commentisfree/2018/jul/12/algorithm-privacy-data-surveillance

I somewhat disagree, I'm a big believer that stereotypes generally serve as an efficient way to classify. But it's worth a post.

Rupert

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Re: When big data classifies you according to stereotypes
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2018, 12:53:57 PM »
I see people who want credit, but cannot get it because they have never had it. So the algo marks them as a bad bet.  A 44 year old lady with some quite severe medical problems, a gross income of 25k p.a. and low over heads, was told no... so she has to save up.

It was for a mobility scooter.... more important than a car.  Along the lines of a pair of legs to most of us.

My point is that it has been happening in the UK for years.  And yes it is appalling.
... Make sure you live before you die.

rcjordan

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Re: When big data classifies you according to stereotypes
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2018, 10:44:05 PM »
Logic clearly dictates that the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. Spock, Wrath Of Khan 

You have to do bulk-handling to meet the needs of vast populations, I'm afraid.

ergophobe

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Re: When big data classifies you according to stereotypes
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2018, 12:47:08 PM »
One of the ones that worries people is that, upon analysis, it turns out that people who mention God in their loan applications have much, much higher rates of default.