Author Topic: Heat pumps on the rise after Minnesota passes new energy law  (Read 5479 times)

rcjordan

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Gonna be a cold winter in Minnesota unless they have auxiliary heat strips and $$$ if they do.

https://techxplore.com/news/2021-07-minnesota-energy-law.html

Brad

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Re: Heat pumps on the rise after Minnesota passes new energy law
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2021, 01:30:08 PM »
A lot of people in Minn. , especially rural, have wood burners or pellet stoves as supplemental/backup.  Suburbanites too.

ergophobe

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Re: Heat pumps on the rise after Minnesota passes new energy law
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2021, 04:18:03 PM »
The fuel-switching issue is interesting. And the fact that they have units that work down to zero F. We're on the cusp of being able to use them for heat. Since it is not uncommon to go into the teens at night and rarely below 25 during the main part of the day, some people do get by with just the air-source heat pump, but when it's in the 20s, they run and run. The overall efficiency of the house is a big factor. The neighbor with a new SIP house has no trouble. The neighbor with an old house with very little insulation has it run non-stop for weeks at a time, sometimes with huge amounts of ice building up on it.

I've also been curious carbon and cost tradeoffs. I think the cost tradeoff would be less here because electricity is expensive in CA, though with the pricing going into effect this year, there will be summer and winter rates for us and the winter rates are a lot lower.

Tiered rates are a big disincentive. If changing to electric heat pushes me into a higher tier, it means those KWH are all at the most expensive rate. If I go into Tier 3, that's 41 cents per KWH. My lowest possible rate in the winter is 23 cents. Google says the average rate in MN is 11.5 cents. So if I went to electric heat, I would be almost 2X to 4X that, which cuts into the savings from a heat pump.

buckworks

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Re: Heat pumps on the rise after Minnesota passes new energy law
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2021, 06:39:53 PM »
Insulate, insulate, insulate!

Brad

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Re: Heat pumps on the rise after Minnesota passes new energy law
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2021, 09:21:41 PM »
Insulate, insulate, insulate!

Exactly.  This will serve anyone well, long into the future.

But, having been in the real estate development business, it's amazing to me how many home buyers pay so little attention to this.  They want play area for their drooling spawn, home theatre room, snarfy kitchen, bathrooms big enough for bus loads of people and a three car garage but if you tell them the house is built to be "green" you get a Homer Simpson blank look.

rcjordan

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Re: Heat pumps on the rise after Minnesota passes new energy law
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2021, 09:49:03 PM »
>Insulate, insulate, insulate!

And, this makes just about any home built before 1970 functionally obsolete.  I sure as hell wouldn't want to rip out the drywall or siding to insulate. ....And those windows are crap by today's standards.  By the time you add it all up, the place is a tear-down.

Rupert

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Re: Heat pumps on the rise after Minnesota passes new energy law
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2021, 07:07:22 PM »
Quote
Tear down

In the UK the building regs don't always make a place better.  Our place in Wales, in a windy (very windy) spot on the coast, has an extension. It has thick insulation in the roof and the walls and actually the floor.  The problem is that the vent requirements mean that the wind that travels through the insulated cavity cool the wall down so much that the 1960s (or 1950s?) wall next to it is warmer.

Also, the venting in the windows means that on a windy day.... it's cold.


I am appalled.
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