Th3 Core

Why We Are Here => Web Development => Topic started by: rcjordan on September 24, 2018, 02:16:49 PM

Title: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: rcjordan on September 24, 2018, 02:16:49 PM
<title per Brad>

Nothing screams "lazy developer with 90s mindset" more.  Oh, the web is just like TV, so we'll just do our standard presentations and slap 'em on the web. It'll be fine.  It's the savvy way to go, 'cause all the kids are using video now!

Travoli is the only one here that'll watch all that crap.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: Brad on September 24, 2018, 02:55:22 PM
It makes me suspicious that they don't want something written down.  That they are hiding something or obscuring something.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: DrCool on September 24, 2018, 04:29:44 PM
I was on a site a few days ago (forget what it was) but I wanted to look through their FAQs. Clicked on one and the answer was a video with no text or summary below. Clicked on another, same thing. Closed the tab and moved on to something else.

It doesn't take much to do a simple transcription and put that below the video.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: Travoli on September 24, 2018, 04:37:12 PM
I look for interesting perspectives/information regardless of format.

The smartest folks release their video/podcast/radio along with a written transcript.

Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: ergophobe on September 24, 2018, 05:43:56 PM
Ha ha! I see this resonates with a lot of us. That's why I added it to the quotes that hit home. It's one of those thoughts that I've never quite verbalized, but that I *feel* constantly when trying to gather info.

Brad just nailed it.

The flip side, I will say, is that we were looking to buy a bike rack. People have long-form written reviews and then tons of sites have videos, none of which answer the actual questions we want answered (can you open the back hatch or the tailgate of a pickup with this rack on it?). Then we came across a guy who does 15-minute review videos with the rack mounted on a Subaru and then he reshoots the review with the rack mounted on a pickup truck. When we saw the pickup-based review I was trying to think of how to tell my wife that I was ready to buy from this guy almost regardless of price, when she says "Wow. We should definitely buy from this guy even if he's more expensive."

Point being, in this case, long video crushed "writing stuff out" and utterly destroyed "short videos." I was ready to pay at least $50 more (15%) to thank that guy, maybe $75. In the end, exact same price as Amazon
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: aaron on September 24, 2018, 07:22:31 PM
In a recent(ish) video interview of Warren Buffett he mentioned how he preferred to read rather than watch or listen because he could scan and process the information so much faster by reading.

Text is also far easier to edit than videos are.

I loathe trying to make video, but in some ways that is what much of the web is becoming anyhow. Google, Apple, Netflix, Hulu, Amazon funding original vids longtail vid niche sites like Crunchyroll big media consolidation with Disney buying Fox, Comcast buying Sky, AT&T buying Time Warner.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: Drastic on September 25, 2018, 10:42:57 PM
>In a recent(ish) video interview of Warren Buffett he mentioned how he preferred to read rather than watch or listen because he could scan and process the information so much faster by reading.

This this this!!! There is no way to quickly glean tidbits from video. I hate video for business/tech unless I need to see someone doing something, which is extremely rare.

In IM circles this sh## has gotten really bad. All the fuckurus (TM drastic) are too lazy to write anything and it's all tons of videos of some idiot blabbering on to fill out "the content." Such a waste of time. It has gotten so bad one of the first things I check is support for text vs. video. If it's all video, axed.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: Brad on September 26, 2018, 12:25:02 AM
Even when they write stuff it is one sentence  that does not explain what their service offering is.  They explain nothing.  One person called it "that Silicon Valley, Apple minimalist vibe."  Pure laziness and BS.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: rcjordan on October 31, 2018, 01:52:40 PM
Zuck:
Quote
too much video promoted passivity, and did not promote social behaviors.
(social behaviors = )engagement

RC: Bingo!

Facebook Sketches a Future With a Diminished News Feed | WIRED
https://www.wired.com/story/facebook-sketches-future-with-diminished-news-feed/
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: Rupert on November 01, 2018, 06:55:00 AM
Sue has been saying for ever how she hates videos. Because she scan reads, and finds what she wants to know in the middle... or the end.

We have no videos because of it  ::)   Pictures are fine, they tell a story. The pickup illustration, could that have been done with a picture Ergo?
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: ergophobe on November 01, 2018, 03:27:18 PM
>>Ergo

I am heavily text biased. I feel like text is my native language. I remember an early discussion in the 1990s with a designer. He was complaining about having text on the page. "People just go straight to the images and ignore all that text anyway."

The other more developer type and I looked at him confusedly and said "Images? Where are the images?"
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: littleman on November 01, 2018, 06:52:18 PM
I am mixed on the issue.  When coding I like to listen to something that engages my mind.  When prepping orders I like to have something playing video or audio that I find interesting.  If I am doing nothing else I do think that reading is more efficient, but if I am active in another way I like to have my extra brain cycles being used.

Also, I'm a curious dyslexic who was reading at a third grade level in high school -- still, to this day I read slower than most people.  As a teen I was very grateful for watching documentaries and lectures that I found stimulating.  Folks like Joseph Campbell (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell) on PBS really did a lot for me.  I use to tell people that I learned far more from television than I did from school*, get funny looks from people and comments like "but TV is sh##".  My reply would be, "it depends on what you watch".

*probably not true later in life




Edit:  I stayed a bit into text vs. video for general consumption, not so much for instructional stuff.  For that I think it really depends on the context.  There have been apps where I've wanted to figure something out and the text just doesn't make sense, but then I watch a 2 minute video on youtube and I get it.  Other times videos seem to be a giant waste of time and bandwidth.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: ergophobe on November 01, 2018, 08:49:14 PM
When coding... When prepping orders...

Similar actually. What I meant really is that
 - when I think of the things that have had big impacts on me, they are mostly text (and the movie Jeremiah Johnson).
 - Music without words rarely has a big impact on me, but words without music often does.
 - I can tune out the radio and the TV, but I can't tune out text. I can't avoid reading signs and t-shirts as I walk down the street
 - etc

Quote
I'm a curious dyslexic who was reading at a third grade level in high school -- still, to this day I read slower than most people.

Runs in my family. I was one of the luck ones. I couldn't tie my shoes until 4th grade (common with dyslexics) and couldn't tell left from right until about age 20. But once I got past the initial hurdle, reading came easily. But I have always been a slow reader.

That scared me off being a historian for a while and I found computer science classes way easier because of the reading volume in the history classes. But I eventually ended up in a specialty of history where the texts are really hard to read and if you read five pages in a day, that can be a good day. Having taught that for 20 years, I've come to believe that dyslexics have a huge advantage there. We're just used to texts being hard to read and puzzling over them.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: littleman on November 01, 2018, 09:14:14 PM
>reading volume

In college I ended up with a double major of economics and literature, partially because of the challenge.

>dyslexics being an advantage

In some ways I think it is, but I am also thankful that my children dodged that bullet.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: Rupert on November 01, 2018, 09:48:43 PM
Quote
curious dyslexic
  I cannot believe this.. me too. 

Have you read:
https://www.dyslexicadvantage.org/

Daughter is too. coloured screen, hates reading as the letters move about etc.  Knows EXACTLY where she is in a city . Missus cannot understand why we are both poor readers.  Although I think I am quite good now.  :P

I feel a glass of wine is bending my brain... we have been here before haven't we.? Not sure I realised there were so many of us here.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: rcjordan on November 01, 2018, 09:57:35 PM
>reading volume

I'm the opposite.  Back in the 6th grade, they brought in a special machine to test my reading because it was obvious I was winging it --not taking any books home.  They clocked me at over 600 wpm, 11th grade level, and 95% comprehension.  Then they brought in the Feds ...but that's another story. Maybe Asheville.

My trouble was/is handwriting. Got a "D" pretty consistently. I've lost count of how many times we've been asked if I'm a doctor after seeing my signature.

>skimming

This was mentioned upstream. I can skim with the best of them, provided I'm not under pressure. 
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: littleman on November 02, 2018, 06:24:47 AM
It makes sense that there is a high percentage of dyslexic people in our space.  Historically internet marketing was a great place for out of the box thinkers.  Also, in general, dyslexics tend to do better in small business environments than being cogs in big corporations.

>we have been here before haven't we?

I think we've touched on it. 

>https://www.dyslexicadvantage.org/


Quote
The mission of Dyslexic Advantage is to promote the positive identity, community, and achievement of dyslexic people by focusing on their strengths.

That's all great, but dyslexics really need grit more than anything else.  Feeling good about dyslexia is fine for kids, but for adults I think it is more about what one has accomplished despite the challenges.  It takes more work, more determination and more reliance on ones other abilities, IMO that's where the pride should come in -- knowing that you are strong enough and cunning enough to not have it stop you.

RC, it sounds like what you have is probably dysgraphia, often dyslexics have that too.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: rcjordan on November 02, 2018, 02:45:39 PM
> dyslexic

I think I saw an article about 3 months ago touting a new font that help with  dyslexia.

> dyslexic

I'd bet on being on the fringe of the autism scale, some aspects being my better characteristics.  Childhood lack of fine muscle co-ordination, sensory overload (particularly music & noise), lack of the need for social contact, the ability to block out everything and focus, -umm- ballistic temper  ...the list goes on.  I'm not complaining, if I have it, it's worked well for me.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: littleman on November 02, 2018, 06:32:09 PM
Sorry for totally hijacking the topic of this thread.

RC, you may find this interesting.  It looks like autism and dyslexia may be caused by opposite ends of a brain development spectrum.

Quote
"Dyslexia and autism are on opposite tails of the normal distribution of the width of minicolumns...Autistic individuals have increased number of smaller minicolumns and dyslexic children have decreased number of larger minicolumns..." When the depth of gyral depths were measured of dyslexics compared to controls, "mean gyral white matter depth was 3.05 mm (SD 0.30 mm) in dyslexic subjects and 1.63 mm (SD 0.15 mm) in the controls." Researchers speculated that longer connectivity in the brains of dyslexics could account for "a greater capacity for abstract, 'visionary' thinking", but also slower development (late blooming?) including a slower development of reading. Its information like this that should reinforce the idea that dyslexic children should have a differentiated educational program (fewer inappropriate demands at early ages) - and recognition of high creative potential and capacity for abstraction.

The changes in autism could also account for why some people with autism show extreme precocity with rote tasks, may have unusual gifts of rapid mathematical calculation, and superior abilities with certain tasks of visual discrimination (like Oliver Sack's account of two twins with autism who could rapid determine when 111 matches had fallen to the ground).
http://eideneurolearningblog.blogspot.com/2009/08/dyslexia-and-autism-are-opposites.html

This is also a good link about the topic. (https://medium.com/@alessiacovello/into-the-dyslexic-brain-4-illustrated-differences-to-guide-you-through-how-the-brain-learns-edc4d887b64)


BTW, if you are autistic it must be a very mild case.  You know a lot more about human nature than most autistic people I've known.
Title: Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
Post by: rcjordan on November 02, 2018, 06:56:30 PM
>totally hijacking the topic of this thread.

HHH, it happens.  The thread had run its course and then some.

>autism

I have one grandson who is definitely autistic. Though it's easily evident, it looks like it's limited enough that he may end up being a much sought-after employee. As alluded to above, some of these are marketable skills. They proved so for me.

There was no autism in the 50s --just geeky kids. 

>mild case

In a way, yes, but apparently wide. When you look back over 60+ years, you can see a good number of characteristics --and a lot of things fit into the mild & broad scenario.  Some, like my aversion to noise, were/are weird when it happened but are classic symptoms.  Others, like math abilities, reading, lone wolf, lesser emotional range --well, they have often been assets rather than liabilities.  That said, who can really tell if I have autism? Seems like everyone says they're on the spectrum nowadays.