Author Topic: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out  (Read 487 times)

rcjordan

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Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2018, 09:57:35 PM »
>reading volume

I'm the opposite.  Back in the 6th grade, they brought in a special machine to test my reading because it was obvious I was winging it --not taking any books home.  They clocked me at over 600 wpm, 11th grade level, and 95% comprehension.  Then they brought in the Feds ...but that's another story. Maybe Asheville.

My trouble was/is handwriting. Got a "D" pretty consistently. I've lost count of how many times we've been asked if I'm a doctor after seeing my signature.

>skimming

This was mentioned upstream. I can skim with the best of them, provided I'm not under pressure. 

littleman

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Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2018, 06:24:47 AM »
It makes sense that there is a high percentage of dyslexic people in our space.  Historically internet marketing was a great place for out of the box thinkers.  Also, in general, dyslexics tend to do better in small business environments than being cogs in big corporations.

>we have been here before haven't we?

I think we've touched on it. 

>https://www.dyslexicadvantage.org/


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The mission of Dyslexic Advantage is to promote the positive identity, community, and achievement of dyslexic people by focusing on their strengths.

That's all great, but dyslexics really need grit more than anything else.  Feeling good about dyslexia is fine for kids, but for adults I think it is more about what one has accomplished despite the challenges.  It takes more work, more determination and more reliance on ones other abilities, IMO that's where the pride should come in -- knowing that you are strong enough and cunning enough to not have it stop you.

RC, it sounds like what you have is probably dysgraphia, often dyslexics have that too.

rcjordan

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Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2018, 02:45:39 PM »
> dyslexic

I think I saw an article about 3 months ago touting a new font that help with  dyslexia.

> dyslexic

I'd bet on being on the fringe of the autism scale, some aspects being my better characteristics.  Childhood lack of fine muscle co-ordination, sensory overload (particularly music & noise), lack of the need for social contact, the ability to block out everything and focus, -umm- ballistic temper  ...the list goes on.  I'm not complaining, if I have it, it's worked well for me.

littleman

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Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2018, 06:32:09 PM »
Sorry for totally hijacking the topic of this thread.

RC, you may find this interesting.  It looks like autism and dyslexia may be caused by opposite ends of a brain development spectrum.

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"Dyslexia and autism are on opposite tails of the normal distribution of the width of minicolumns...Autistic individuals have increased number of smaller minicolumns and dyslexic children have decreased number of larger minicolumns..." When the depth of gyral depths were measured of dyslexics compared to controls, "mean gyral white matter depth was 3.05 mm (SD 0.30 mm) in dyslexic subjects and 1.63 mm (SD 0.15 mm) in the controls." Researchers speculated that longer connectivity in the brains of dyslexics could account for "a greater capacity for abstract, 'visionary' thinking", but also slower development (late blooming?) including a slower development of reading. Its information like this that should reinforce the idea that dyslexic children should have a differentiated educational program (fewer inappropriate demands at early ages) - and recognition of high creative potential and capacity for abstraction.

The changes in autism could also account for why some people with autism show extreme precocity with rote tasks, may have unusual gifts of rapid mathematical calculation, and superior abilities with certain tasks of visual discrimination (like Oliver Sack's account of two twins with autism who could rapid determine when 111 matches had fallen to the ground).
http://eideneurolearningblog.blogspot.com/2009/08/dyslexia-and-autism-are-opposites.html

This is also a good link about the topic.


BTW, if you are autistic it must be a very mild case.  You know a lot more about human nature than most autistic people I've known.

rcjordan

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Re: companies using a bunch of short videos instead of writing stuff out
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2018, 06:56:30 PM »
>totally hijacking the topic of this thread.

HHH, it happens.  The thread had run its course and then some.

>autism

I have one grandson who is definitely autistic. Though it's easily evident, it looks like it's limited enough that he may end up being a much sought-after employee. As alluded to above, some of these are marketable skills. They proved so for me.

There was no autism in the 50s --just geeky kids. 

>mild case

In a way, yes, but apparently wide. When you look back over 60+ years, you can see a good number of characteristics --and a lot of things fit into the mild & broad scenario.  Some, like my aversion to noise, were/are weird when it happened but are classic symptoms.  Others, like math abilities, reading, lone wolf, lesser emotional range --well, they have often been assets rather than liabilities.  That said, who can really tell if I have autism? Seems like everyone says they're on the spectrum nowadays.